C&C report assessors

Process to get Chartered - assessment 

Image of BWeightman Barry Weightman CEng FIChemE
Senior manager, Engineering Operations
KBR (UK) Ltd

My background

As a senior manager in the KBR engineering group, I am the department manager responsible for the process engineering, process safety and environmental design activities in the London Operating Centre of KBR. This is one of the largest groups of chemical engineers in the UK and therefore I am very conscious of the need to provide a robust and comprehensive training programme for our younger engineers to make their development for Chartered status as painless and as interesting as possible. In fact the training programme is accredited by IChemE and this means we have that external assurance that we are providing the training expected by IChemE.

My role at IChemE

For the last four years, I have also been a member of the IChemE Professional Formation Forum (PFF) - formerly known as the Membership Committee - and this means that I am able to offer my own insight to the PFF from running an IChemE accredited training programme (ACTS) and working directly with our engineers seeking to become Chartered.

Like other PFF members, I review four Competence and Commitment (C&C) reports every six to eight weeks from candidates from other companies and also act as an assessor of ACTS. Recently I helped to develop the guidelines for the C&C report assessors in order to obtain a common approach to reviewing applications from candidates. Finally, I take part in interviews of candidates who have passed the C&C report stage and are only left with completing a satisfactory interview to complete their assessment.

I enjoy the interaction I have with other PFF members, with other companies when I assess their ACTS, the reviewing of C&C reports and interviewing of candidates. I am always amazed by the diversity of the work that is undertaken in the chemical engineering profession and the enthusiasm of all candidates I meet and the companies involved. I feel it is important to put back into the profession any relevant experience I have and I am sure my company get some benefit as well as I am able to utilise some of the ways that each company approaches their training programmes.

Advice for candidates

My advice to any chemical engineer in the start or middle of their training is to tackle any task put to them and any opportunity to do something new. All experience is good experience and will help you develop as an engineer. However it is really important to keep a detailed log of what you have done in the context of the sections of the C&C report and to seek the support of your mentor. This will make it much easier for you when the time comes to write up your experience in your C&C report.


Image of DSwinbourne Professor Doug Swinbourne CEng CSci FIChemE
Research director, School of Civil and Chemical Engineering
RMIT University, Australia

My background

I have been an academic all of my working life. After graduating from the University of New South Wales with a BSc and PhD in metallurgy, I started as a high school science teacher and it was there that I learnt the fundamentals of teaching. I then spent two enjoyable years at the Universiti Sains Malaysia before joining RMIT in Melbourne in 1981. I have been there ever since and have variously been the head of metallurgy, head of chemical engineering, head of the school of civil, environmental and chemical engineering and most recently the deputy head of research and innovation. 

My role at IChemE

I am an IChemE Fellow and since 2005 I have been the Victorian member of the Professional Formation Forum Nominations Committee, assessing Competence and Commitment reports from prospective members and then interviewing them. So far I have assessed 27 C&C reports and taken part in 43 interviews. I get a great deal of enjoyment from this role. It is a useful contribution to our profession, but it is also a way to meet a lot of very interesting and, at times, influential engineers.

Advice for candidates

My advice to any young engineer contemplating getting chartered - and everybody should - is to read the requirements for the C&C report as soon as possible and to keep a diary and record everything that could be used to support your case. If you find that you are not gaining enough experience in some of the areas, ask your manager to find opportunities for you. It is in your company's interest, as well as your own, that you acquire a balanced and broad engineering competence.

In the non-technical sections of the C&C report you should reflect on why you have acted the way you have, how you change your response to circumstances as they change, how you know that what you have done has been successful. Think also about what being a professional really means and what your duties are to your company and the society at large. Read the IChemE Code of Conduct and reflect on how you respond to ethical dilemmas. In summary, you need to demonstrate that you are acquiring engineering maturity.